Conspicuity

It is time to adopt modern reflective colors for truck and trailer conspicuity enhancements. The Underride Network had several member activists receive awards from then President Clinton for their work for reflective tape on big rigs and trailers. We recommended then and now that fluorescent colors replace the poor performing red and white to save lives. A Canadian study found white tape increased driver recognition by over 350 feet from that of red and white tape. Fluorescent colors have similar candlepower to white tape with the added visibility of color for daytime recognition. Lime green and bright orange are commonplace on traffic signs and emergency vehicles because of their superior candlepower. Increasing the amount of reflectors and maintaining cleanliness of reflective material can also increase reaction time for motorists approaching slow moving trucks on hills and in slow moving traffic. Road film can decrease effectiveness of tape and reflectors by 90%.

 

Tape Effectiveness Study

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Clean tape and lights with cleaning solvent at every pre-trip inspection to maintain conspicuity! It’s the law!

§392.33 Obscured lamps or reflective devices/material. (U.S.A.)

(a) No commercial motor vehicle shall be driven when any of the lamps or reflective devices/material required by subpart B of part 393 of this title are obscured by the tailboard, or by any part of the load or its covering, by dirt, or other added vehicle or work equipment or otherwise.

 

Color Effectiveness

Red and white can blend in to traffic background colors from headlights and tail lights (Red and white dot confusion). 67% of fatal crashes occurred in daytime during 2004 in the U.S.

USROADS.COM article outlining crash data for lime-yellow fire trucks

 

FMCSA conspicuity Requirements for CMV’s

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Octagonal flourescent reflective markingsFluorescent Lime Green versus red and white for visibility

 

Tape Links

 

Coal Truck PicUnsafe Parked Trucks – Please use triangles to save lives and give drivers warning!
Kentucky single-unit coal truck with poor guard and poor visibility or conspicuity.

Pre-plan your trip to include safe parking areas such as truck stops, company parking, and motels. Map low-speed roadways if needed to avoid high-speed roadway parking or stopping.

 http://www.truckstops.com/

 

ATA Associates 60 Seconds to Place Triangles

 

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The law requires for trucks and trailers and we recommend for cars to always light emergency flashers and place triangles whenever you are parking on a high-speed roadway (30 mph and above). Always park on low-speed roadways (Below 30 mph) if you are able to, and also park under street lights if available. Reaction time for recognizing the hazard and then taking emergency actions such as swerving or braking can take several seconds and so requires a long distance of warning of the hazard ahead. Flashers and triangles give warning of an hazard and will also give warning of an parked or stopped vehicle. They prevent both Red-Dot confusion and Moth-to-Flame accidents. Disabled trucks must always light emergency flashers and place triangles or other warning devices. Too many rear of truck fatal crashes are preventable with 2 minutes of effort.

Truck Parking Regulation for U.S.

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/title49/section/392.22

Part 392
DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES

§ 392.22: Emergency signals; stopped commercial motor vehicles.

(a) Hazard warning signal flashers. Whenever a commercial motor vehicle is stopped upon the traveled portion of a highway or the shoulder of a highway for any cause other than necessary traffic stops, the driver of the stopped commercial motor vehicle shall immediately activate the vehicular hazard warning signal flashers and continue the flashing until the driver places the warning devices required by paragraph (b) of this section. The flashing signals shall be used during the time the warning devices are picked up for storage before movement of the commercial motor vehicle. The flashing lights may be used at other times while a commercial motor vehicle is stopped in addition to, but not in lieu of, the warning devices required by paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) Placement of warning devices —(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, whenever a commercial motor vehicle is stopped upon the traveled portion or the shoulder of a highway for any cause other than necessary traffic stops, the driver shall, as soon as possible, but in any event within 10 minutes, place the warning devices required by § 393.95 of this subchapter, in the following manner:

(i) One on the traffic side of and 4 paces (approximately 3 meters or 10 feet) from the stopped commercial motor vehicle in the direction of approaching traffic;

(ii) One at 40 paces (approximately 30 meters or 100 feet) from the stopped commercial motor vehicle in the center of the traffic lane or shoulder occupied by the commercial motor vehicle and in the direction of approaching traffic; and

(iii) One at 40 paces (approximately 30 meters or 100 feet) from the stopped commercial motor vehicle in the center of the traffic lane or shoulder occupied by the commercial motor vehicle and in the direction away from approaching traffic.

(2) Special rules —(i) Fusees and liquid-burning flares. The driver of a commercial motor vehicle equipped with only fusees or liquid-burning flares shall place a lighted fusee or liquid-burning flare at each of the locations specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. There shall be at least one lighted fusee or liquid-burning flare at each of the prescribed locations, as long as the commercial motor vehicle is stopped. Before the stopped commercial motor vehicle is moved, the driver shall extinguish and remove each fusee or liquid-burning flare.

(ii) Daylight hours. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section, during the period lighted lamps are not required, three bidirectional reflective triangles, or three lighted fusees or liquid-burning flares shall be placed as specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section within a time of 10 minutes. In the event the driver elects to use only fusees or liquid-burning flares in lieu of bidirectional reflective triangles or red flags, the driver must ensure that at least one fusee or liquid-burning flare remains lighted at each of the prescribed locations as long as the commercial motor vehicle is stopped or parked.

(iii) Business or residential districts. The placement of warning devices is not required within the business or residential district of a municipality, except during the time lighted lamps are required and when street or highway lighting is insufficient to make a commercial motor vehicle clearly discernable at a distance of 500 feet to persons on the highway.

(iv) Hills, curves, and obstructions. If a commercial motor vehicle is stopped within 500 feet of a curve, crest of a hill, or other obstruction to view, the driver shall place the warning signal required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section in the direction of the obstruction to view a distance of 100 feet to 500 feet from the stopped commercial motor vehicle so as to afford ample warning to other users of the highway.

(v) Divided or one-way roads. If a commercial motor vehicle is stopped upon the traveled portion or the shoulder of a divided or one-way highway, the driver shall place the warning devices required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section, one warning device at a distance of 200 feet and one warning device at a distance of 100 feet in a direction toward approaching traffic in the center of the lane or shoulder occupied by the commercial motor vehicle. He/she shall place one warning device at the traffic side of the commercial motor vehicle within 10 feet of the rear of the commercial motor vehicle.

(vi) Leaking, flammable material. If gasoline or any other flammable liquid, or combustible liquid or gas seeps or leaks from a fuel container or a commercial motor vehicle stopped upon a highway, no emergency warning signal producing a flame shall be lighted or placed except at such a distance from any such liquid or gas as will assure the prevention of a fire or explosion.

Citation: [37 FR 17175, Aug. 25, 1972, as amended at 40 FR 10685, Mar. 7, 1975; 47 FR 47837, Oct. 28, 1982; 48 FR 57139, Dec. 23, 1983; 59 FR 34711, July 6, 1994; 60 FR 38747, July 28, 1995; 63 FR 33279, June 18, 1998]